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The Children’s Play: Review

Shelbie Cook, Editor

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All opinions are my own.

The students of Repertory Theatre presented the Children’s Plays last week on October 26th. The production consisted of three main shows created by high school students, and was directed towards younger children (hence the name). Each show was only one act long and took about a month to create, with most of the work being done in class. Student were also in charge of putting together their own set design — which was very minimal — as well as their own costumes. Because all of this was done in such a short amount of time, I was amazed at the production of each show. Though the props and set design were limited, and the costumes were not the most extravagant, each show was well thought out, and provided the children in the audience with important life lessons.

In between each main play, there were smaller storylines created by third grade students and adapted into workable shows by the high school students in Repertory Theatre, which was a perfect addition to the Children’s Plays as a whole. It was a great way to encourage these students to be writers themselves and create their own stories for people to watch. Below is my review on each individual play:

“Louisa and the League of Lessons”

Director: Brynna Darley

Assistant Director: Hunter Hotaling

A young girl named Louisa (Paige Padgett) gets payed a visit from the League of Lessons — a trio that assists Louisa through important life decisions. Honesty Oliver (Preston Thomas) teaches Louisa why cheating is wrong, as she had cheated off of her peer (Cam Burns); she was able to travel back in time to fix her mistake. (It should be noted that Audrey Colombo was supposed to play the role of Luisa’s peer, but she was not present during the show.) Louisa then learns the importance of standing up for others who are being bullied, with the help of Brett Bravery (Will Snodgrass), and is able to stand up to Victor (Joshua Twitchell) and save her friend Whiney Riley (Declan Wolfe). Lastly, she grasps the understanding of forgiving herself for the mistakes she had made, as Forgiveness Franny (Cassady Giefer) explained that everyone makes mistakes, and it’s important to learn from them to better ourselves as individuals.

As the first production created by the students of Repertory Theatre, the expectation for the rest of the shows were set to a high standard. The examples used throughout this particular show were relatable, which is important when trying to teach the children in the audience an important life lesson. It was also a great idea to give Louisa the opportunity to fix her mistakes by traveling back into time, though it was later mentioned that in reality, this isn’t necessarily the case. This show touched on the subject of making the right choice to begin with, though it also emphasized the importance of forgiving yourself for the mistakes you do make. I felt that this was especially important since forgiving yourself is the first step into becoming a better person.

“A Day of Imagination”

Director: Janelle Braswell

Assistant Director: Ni’Jah Porter

Three students are encouraged to use their creativity and imagination by their teacher (Ashlee Potter). Kelly (Breanna Wuerzberger) imagines herself as a princess of a kingdom, and comes across a dragon named Herbert (Jessie Twitchell) whom she learns is actually not as mean as she had previously thought all dragons to be. The second student, Matthew (Zach Brown), with the help of his trusty sidekick — a breadstick — is a superhero in a world where spaghetti is the only food consumed. However, Dr. Taco (Twitchell) tries to conquer the town and force everyone to eat tacos instead. Eventually both Matthew and Dr. Taco come to a conclusion that spaghetti and tacos can be eaten in harmony. The last student is Danielle (Braswell) who imagines herself as an explorer, who similarly to her fellow peers comes across a “villain”. Danielle meets a lion (Meadow DelBorrell) who at first can be described as rude and ferocious, but as the story progresses, the lion is actually a scaredy-cat (no pun intended). The story ends with the two characters then becoming friends as Danielle helps the lion down a tree.

This was the second main production of the Children’s Plays, and presented a message that was original: creativity is important. Compared to the other two shows, “A Day of Imagination” had the most interesting perspective. It was a great message for the children in the audience as it encouraged the use of imagination, which is an important aspect of anyone’s childhood. Though this 9was the main point emphasized in the play, there was an underlining meaning that taught others to not judge a person by the way they look. I don’t know whether this was intentional or not, but it was laced within the storyline and added an important element to the play.

“The Adventures of Earth Woman”

Director: Kelsey East

Musical Director and Writer: Cam Burns

A girl named Karry (Jasmine Hutchison) learns about the importance of recycling from Earth Woman (Kaelana Mong). Earth Woman shows how littering can effect the habitats and lifestyles of different animals: a turtle (Jake Merino), a bird (Meadow DelBorrell), and giraffe (Vanessa Zapata).

This was the final play of the show, and it was my favorite out of all three. The lesson that was presented wasn’t the most original, as recycling has been stressed and encouraged for the longest time. However, it was the way the message was portrayed that made this production the most unique out of the three. The music that accompanied the storyline added an element that made it fun to watch and enjoy. Looking around the audience, I could tell that the children who were present were instantly intrigued one Burns began playing the piano.

Overall it was a great performance by all the students in repertory Theatre. However, I still have one question:

Where the heck was Vanessa?

 

 

 

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The Children’s Play: Review