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Solar Eclipse?

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Madeline Fay
This info graphic depicts some facts about total solar eclipses, as well as the paths of totality for the eclipse this Monday and the one predicted for 2024. (Info graphic by Madeline Fay)

Did you see the solar eclipse? The students at Lansing High School weren’t able to due to clouds drifting overhead, but the district did everything in their power to keep them safe in the event of a solar eclipse. All students and staff members were educated about the solar eclipse on the first day of school. Many videos that were presented had talked about all of the safety standards that needed to be followed during this event.

“The district supplied them, but I was prepared [already purchased] enough for my class. This was a significant experience; we all needed the opportunity to be a part of it,” chemistry teacher Anne Krebs said.

Eclipse glasses were handed out to each student before they headed outside to watch. Each teacher had to make sure to count everyone that would be absent during the event because they were short on the amount of glasses. Students started to panic because they weren’t sure if they would be able to get a pair or not and miss out on this experience.

“I was disappointed that we didn’t have enough for all students to experience something that doesn’t happen very often,” junior Kasey Parks said. “I thought that I wouldn’t get a pair of glasses since my last name is at the end of the alphabet.”

Lansing students sat on the visitor side of the football stadium while there was appropriately themed music playing in the background. There was no need for the glasses because of the clouds that blocked out the sun. The music and the teachers on the track helped with keeping the atmosphere interesting as the eclipse cycle was nearing totality.

“I was irritated that we were able to see the sun through the window during class, but not when we were outside to watch the eclipse,” junior Ni’Jah Porter said. “It was still an experience with how dark it got outside without actually seeing the eclipse.”

During totality the temperature dropped and the wind started to pick up. The sky above was dark, but if someone looked far enough into the horizon they could see a light shade of pink. While the music played, students took out their phones, turned on their flashlights, and waved them side to side slowly.

“I expected to see the moon covering the sun completely until I heard that it was supposed to be cloudy and storm,” junior Alyssa Foley said. “I was bummed because it’s now a historical event that we didn’t get to see, but I was really shocked at how dark it got.”

About five minutes after totality, it started to sprinkle and then, not even ten seconds later, it started to rain harder. Students rushed back inside to take cover as it started to pour.

Although the eclipse this year may have been a bit underwhelming, the country will have another chance to witness the phenomenon in 2024.

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The student news site of Lansing High School
Solar Eclipse?