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CCR: Not Your Average Seminar

Mr.+Myers%27+CCR+class+listens+to+him.+Students+in+CCR+class+studied+and+finished++their+homework.
Mr. Myers' CCR class listens to him. Students in CCR class studied and finished  their homework.

Mr. Myers' CCR class listens to him. Students in CCR class studied and finished their homework.

Olivia Jarvis

Olivia Jarvis

Mr. Myers' CCR class listens to him. Students in CCR class studied and finished their homework.

Olivia Jarvis and Shelby Brier

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The new school year has brought many new changes, and everyone is having to try to navigate the new school and deal with all of the other changes that have happened. There are no longer lockers, everyone has an iPad of their own, and seminar is a thing of the past, with ‘Career and College Readiness’ taking its place.

Now instead of having half an hour to study, sleep, or do anything else you may need, there will be a structured class style setting. The hope is that Career and College Readiness (CCR) will help students prepare for their lives after high school, whether that is narrowing down a possible college or picking out their dream career. The teachers who helped create CCR were Mr. Brian Malm, Mrs. Jessica McRae, Mr. Casey McCord, Mr. Don Allen, and Mr. Zack Craig.

“There will be less time wasted and people will be given more resources,” Mr. Malm said, for the purpose of CCR.

For as long as students can remember they have been having a seminar sometime during fifth hour class. Students normally had around thirty-five minutes to work on homework, study for an upcoming test, or take a few minutes to unwind. Some teachers had a strict no-speaking policy during their seminars and others allowed people to talk and work together. If you were especially lucky with who was your seminar teacher, you could ask to go out and work in the hall, either by yourself or with a group of friends.

“I wish instead of activities we had time to study and do homework, like last year.” Junior Ryan Meara said.

CCR time in session! Students learned and studied.

Olivia Jarvis
 CCR students sit in one of the many science classrooms listening to the plan for Thursdays. They proceeded to go to teachers if they needed it, or used that time to study.

Many students feel the same as Ryan and view CCR as “pointless” or “a waste of time”. In fact, a lot of upperclassmen with jobs are afraid they won’t be able to finish their homework by given due dates. However, the teachers in charge of CCR have worked very hard in creating a schedule and activities that will help benefit students. Many teachers are excited by CCR. Mr. McCord mentioned that soon, all of the freshmen will make a four-year plan for their high school career to help them graduate. Upperclassmen may end up doing something similar. All students will eventually have an organized plan for their futures and keep their CCR teachers updated.

“We are going to add academic vocabulary soon,” Mrs. McRae said. The vocabulary words will not only help broaden our speaking but, they will help students on the ACT and the SAT.

While there are, of course, some people who don’t like the new plan, the majority of the student body seems to be open to the concept of it. 

“It gives me more options for college. With football, broadcasting, and journalism there isn’t much of a window. I hope it widens my window,” Senior Juwan Peace said.

Everyone has hopes of their own for the new CCR time. The majority seem to be that the students get more study time and time to do homework. Now, students will have someone to go to when they want to get organized with their future.

“I think it will help us greatly. We are all at one time and everyone is together. Now it’s more relaxed,” said Senior Caroline Pattee. “I do wish we had more homework time because I feel like I never have time, but it reduces the stress a lot.”

Others, however, hope to see things that will help them in their life.

“I want to learn basic adult skills and have time for homework,” Senior Raina Perez said.

Whether you love it or hate it, CCR is here to stay. It is a new program that will go through new changes and hopefully become more flexible for those kids with jobs or extracurricular activities. Mr. McCord and Mr. Malm ask for you to be open-minded about the program and give it time.

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CCR: Not Your Average Seminar